Fight the D word for mental wellbeing

NHS Moodzone
NHS Moodzone

Depression.

It’s a taboo in many social circles, and unfortunately the only time it’s mentioned in mine is usually in context to the British weather.

But that’s not good enough. Because, while the grey weather of Britain can dampen even the chirpiest mood, it shouldn’t take away from talking about the implications of mental health.

Depression has lived with me for most of my adult life. Talking about it hasn’t been the easiest thing to do, let alone seeking help. I’ve learned to shy from people in my low days and/or put on a brave smile to hide the sinking inside of me. Then often I just wait… and wait… and wait and pray for the day I can wake up happy and get back to my normal self before the D word kicks in again for the next cycle. But there’s always light at the end of the tunnel.

To help flight the D word and gain mental wellbeing, I looked on the NHS website for some insight:

“Depression is more than simply feeling unhappy or fed up for a few days.
We all go through spells of feeling down, but when you’re depressed you feel persistently sad for weeks or months, rather than just a few days.
Some people still think that depression is trivial and not a genuine health condition. They’re wrong. Depression is a real illness with real symptoms, and it’s not a sign of weakness or something you can “snap out of” by “pulling yourself together”.
The good news is that with the right treatment and support, most people can make a full recovery.”

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Some key steps you can take to lift your mood and help your recovery from depression.

Excercise:
Research suggests that exercise can be as effective as antidepressants at reducing depression symptoms – and that’s great news for me because I’ve never been keen on taking medication – any form of it if possible. I believe our bodies are able to heal themselves with the help of natural aids. I’m often paranoid that anti-depressant will eventually just eat away at my brain…
I’ve been a member of GLL (Better) gyms for almost 10 years since living in central London, and having local gyms nearby is what has sustained me in keeping fit (or at least trying to). Exercise classes have really helped lift away my depression in the past, especially yoga classes… The hardest hurdle for me at times however, is the confidence to even leave the house. Exercise has and will always play an important part of me kicking the D word in the a***!

Diet:
You are what you eat– ain’t that the truth! When I indulge in junk food for days on end – I feel worthless and out of control. I love to eat healthy however the motivation isn’t always there to lift the wok out of the cupboard let alone peel and onion on my low days. Junk food always seems to be at hand when I fall into depression. Beating this habit is the first step towards feeling good about yourself. “My body is a temple” I must remind myself.

Self-help:
Read more information about boosting your mood, coping with stress, anxiety or depression, or simply improving your overall emotional wellbeing. Self-help books have been given some slack over the years, but lets face it, the right ones can do wonders towards getting you in the right direction. I’m a bit of a book hoarder myself (self-help books included), though I haven’t read everyone sitting on my self, there’s something comforting about knowing they there for those just-incase days. And you shouldn’t have to wait until you’re depressed before you read about boosting your mood either. They are a good way of preventing depression by being aware to keep a sustainable healthy mood and coping with stress before it overwhelms you. Checkout the NHS Moodzone for more.

Here are a few sites I’ve used in the past which have been helpful.

Living Life to The Full A self-help life skill course. Modules on problem solving and anxiety

Samaritans 24 hour confidential support for people experiencing distress or despair. Get in touch by telephone, email, letter of face to face

MIND Comprehensive information on a range of mental health issues

MoodGYM Cognitive behavioural therapy skills for preventing and coping with depression

Students Against Depression Developed in consultation with students affected by depression, low mood or suicidal thoughts. Includes their stories and suggestions and suggestions as well as self-help strategies

Blue Pages Information about depression and treatment

Beat Information and helpline for people with eating disorders

HOPELineUK confidential helpline for young people dealing with suicidal, depression and emotional stress 0800 068 4141 (UK)

Sending you positive vibes and light. Namaste x

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